FIRE PREVENTION AND HOME SAFETY TIPS

Today’s home fires burn faster than ever. In a typical home fire, you may have as little as one to two minutes to escape safely from the time the smoke alarm sounds. Knowing how to use that time wisely takes planning and practice.

The Culpeper Volunteer Fire Department teams up with the National Fire Protection Association (NFPA) ­‑‑ the official sponsor of Fire Prevention Week™ for more than 90 years ‑‑ to educate the public about basic but essential ways to quickly and safely escape a home fire.

“Look. Listen. Learn.” are three simple steps people can take to help quickly and safely escape a fire:

  • Look for places fire could start.
  • Listen for the sound of the smoke alarm.
  • Learn 2 ways out of every room

Home Fire Facts:

  • U.S. fire departments respond to an average of one home fire every 86 seconds.
  • Between 2011 and 2015, U.S. fire departments responded to an average of 358,500 home structure fires per year. These fires caused 12,300 civilian injuries, 2,510 civilian deaths, and $6.7 billion in direct damage.
  • On average, seven people per day die in U.S. home fires.
  • Cooking is the leading cause of home fires and home-fire injuries.
  • For decades, smoking has been the leading cause of home-fire deaths.
  • Heating equipment was involved in one in every five home-fire deaths.

Smoke Alarms Facts:

  • Smoke alarms provide an early warning of a fire, giving people additional time to escape.
  • Working smoke alarms cut the risk of dying in a reported home fire in half.
  • Three in every five home-fire deaths result from fires in homes with no smoke alarms (38%) or no working smoke alarms (21%).
  • When smoke alarms fail to operate, it is usually because batteries are missing, disconnected, or dead. Dead batteries caused one-quarter (24%)of the smoke alarm failures.
  • Interconnected smoke alarms throughout the home increase safety. When one sounds, they all sound. It is especially important to have interconnected alarms if you sleep with the door closed.

For more fire safety and prevention tips, visit: the National Fire Protection Association (NFPA) website.